Do you feel demoralized or worn out by the lack of respect towards you that makes it difficult to handle responsibilities like growing the business, managing performance and even firing people?

Ever secretly feel like you are a fraud who is just “getting away with it?”

You can reclaim your time, speak with authority and grace … and  be listened to…

Amy felt like an utter failure. Four years after purchasing her father’s construction business, she was completely overwhelmed and exhausted—and the business kept declining.

She was CEO, but she had no time to manage and lead the business. Instead, she expended all her energy trying to make her employees feel cheerful and happy. She was miserable—sick to death of being interrupted constantly and talked over at meetings. And, she was disappointed in herself, because she knew she was failing to do things she should do.

For example, as a woman-owned business, Amy theoretically had access to a bounty of lucrative government contracts—an absolute gold mine. But years after taking over the business, she somehow still had not managed to fill out the paperwork. She saw the successful business her father proudly built up over the years slide closer to ruin. Would she forced to sell the business before it collapsed? Was there any way out?

These struggles are common for women leaders in small businesses. Perhaps you recognize the issues Amy is dealing with yourself. It does not have to be this way, though.

Picture yourself confidently managing your day and managing your team—so you can be a respected leader in your business.

  • You wake up feeling clear about what will make this a great day—and excited to get back to work. Every day, you accomplish your two or three main objectives—or better than that.
  • Even in potentially difficult situations, you handle yourself with authority and grace. You get what you want and need from those around you, and everyone stays friendly, collaborative and focused on the long-term good of the business.
  • When you get home, you have time to relax and recharge. You’re ready for the next day.
  • You can tell that people are really listening you. They respect your decisions, and you feel their support when it’s time to get things done. It feels good to take ownership of your success. As a result, you can be an effective leader in your business—and the financial results prove it!

Our culture does not teach women to stand up, speak up and promote their own interests.

Women in leadership positions, especially in family businesses, carry around a great deal of cultural baggage. The family legacy of being a little girl who needs protection is hard to shed when you are working in the family business.

Societal messages about what women are supposed to be still reinforce old roles. Women, even those in positions of power, are still expected to mother those around around them. When a female CEO is taking care of everyone else’s feelings or bringing homemade cookies to board meetings, she is reinforcing the message that she is the Mom… not the boss.

Some women try to win over colleagues by being accommodating and nice. They advocate for the interests of their colleagues in the hopes that their turn will come, but it never does. There is always someone else tooting their horn louder.Commonly, a woman who tries to be in charge and powerful quickly finds herself called a “b*tch” behind her back—and she knows it. This hurtful experience often makes female leaders feel like need to go back to being “nicer.”

Many women, though, have discovered how they can overcome this cultural baggage and ask for—and get—what they are looking for. This means you can reap the rewards for your contribution at work, with clients, at home and with family.

Discover how to know your value, stand up for your interests and create win-win situations.

The good news: women are not born to take second place. You can reclaim your boundaries and handle difficult situations — even conflict — masterfully. There’s a proven path to get you back in control:

  1. Learn to use everyday situations as opportunities to ask for what you want and create flow in your life.
  2. Go directly for what is important to you, ask for what you really desire, and you will receive more of what you want and need.
  3. Gain control of your own self-worth.
  4. Think in terms of greater possibilities—more joy, time or money—instead of hanging on to old beliefs about what you deserve.
  5. Discover your ability to hear criticism without having your feelings hurt.
  6. Put yourself first in a way others respect. Easily and gracefully manage and limit the demands other people make of your time, money, creativity and peace of mind. Manage interruptions and disrespectful behavior with charm, humor and confidence.
  7. Speak to the value of your contribution and get paid what you are worth.

The most important step: stop waiting – take action now and don’t expect other people do this for you. There will be no miracle to give you what you deserve.

When I helped Amy take these steps, her life and her business began improving rapidly. Her staff now takes care of their own work and looks out for Amy’s needs. She finished that certification as a woman-owned business, opening the door to a goldmine of contracts. She conducts herself with confidence and is no longer interrupted. She speaks with authority and grace – and people listen to her. Let me help you do the same via the Smart Cookie Finishing School (coming soon), one of my specialized coaching packages or upcoming events.

Your Free 5-Day Plan to Say No with Authority and Grace

Each time you say no, you’re actually saying yes to yourself and your goals.
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Client Praise

A Step Forward

I've finally taken that step forward and created my new venture, a Spanish language immersion program for adults.  I have to tell you that Marsha’s negotiation workshops along with private sessions gave me the impetus to follow through on a dream I had shelved 30 years ago.
María Dolores G.
Educator/Entrepreneur

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